Historical Markers In & Around Pittsburgh

Find historical markers in Pittsburgh! Over 2,000 aluminum signs mark the sites of historic events, notable birth places and other interesting history throughout the state of Pennsylvania. These historical markers provide insight into the history of each particular location, but together provide an interesting snapshot of the region’s past as a whole. The Historical Marker Program is over 100 years old, but is still active, as more markers are added every year.

Here are the exact locations and wording of 384 historical markers in and around Pittsburgh. For additional attractions, historical sites and points of interest around the markers, view our Map of All Listings or visit the Southwestern Pennsylvania Guide daily for local history and happenings.

The Pennsylvania Historical Markers are administered and maintained by the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission. For more information, visit their site at http://www.phmc.pa.gov/

Fallingwater

Fallingwater (1 of 2)

1635 Mill Run Rd, Mill Run, PA 15464, USA

Designed by Frank Lloyd Wright (1867-1959), this house was built in 1936 as a family retreat for Pittsburgh businessman Edgar J. Kaufmann. Widely admired for its design, it is dramatically cantilevered over a waterfall; it exemplifies Wright’s desire to join architecture with nature. Edgar Kaufmann jr.– Read More…

Kennywood Park Pittsburgh

Kennywood Park

4800 Kennywood Blvd, West Mifflin, PA 15122, USA

A National Historic Landmark, designated 1987. In 1898 a picnic grove on Anthony Kenny’s farm here was leased to the Monongahela Street Railway Co. for an amusement park linked to Pittsburgh by its trolley line. Sold to private interests in 1906, the park was to survive a Depression, recessions, and two World Wars.– Read More…

1909 McKee’s Rocks Strike

2-98 Graham St, McKees Rocks, PA 15136, USA

On July 14, unskilled immigrant workers led a strike against the Pressed Steel Car Company. Strain among the strikers, replacement laborers, and state police erupted into a riot on August 22. Eleven men were killed near this footbridge.– Read More…

1948 Donora Smog, The

500-502 PA-837, Donora, PA 15033, USA

Major federal clean air laws became a legacy of this environmental disaster that focused national attention on air pollution. In late October of 1948, a heavy fog blanketed this valley, and as the days passed, the fog became a thick, acrid smog that left about 20 people dead and thousands ill.– Read More…

Absalom (Albert) Hazlett (1837-1860)

1988-2046 S 6th St, Indiana, PA 15701, USA

A staunch abolitionist, Hazlett became a lieutenant in John Brown’s provisional army and participated in the raid on Harper’s Ferry Arsenal in 1859. He was captured, tried, convicted, and hanged for his involvement following the failed Harper’s Ferry attack. This incident, intended to arm slaves to fight for their own freedom, was a major catalyst for the outbreak of the Civil War.– Read More…

Alan Freed (1921-1965)

1320 Graham Ave, Windber, PA 15963, USA

Disc jockey who coined the term “Rock & Roll” in the early 1950s. Freed used the term to describe up-tempo black rhythm and blues records he played as DJ “Moondog” on his radio show. Freed further popularized this music through TV programs, movies, and concerts, including what is considered to be the nation’s first Rock & Roll concert (1952).– Read More…

Albert Gallatin

117 Penn St, Point Marion, PA 15474, USA

Jeffersonian diplomat, financier, and statesman, Gallatin was the longest serving US Secretary of the Treasury, 1801 to 1814. As such, he facilitated the Lewis and Clark Expedition, successfully reduced the national debt until the War of 1812, and helped negotiate the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the war. In the 1790s he was instrumental in calming the Whiskey Rebellion in western Pa.– Read More…

Allegheny County

501-509 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA

Formed September 24, 1788 out of Westmoreland and Washington counties. Named for the Allegheny River. County seat of Pittsburgh was laid out 1764; became a city in 1816.– Read More…

Allegheny Portage Railroad Plane No. 2

101-179 Munster Rd, Portage, PA 15946, USA

From 1834 to 1854 this 36-mile line connected Hollidaysburg to Johnstown. The railroad portaged canal boats over the Allegheny Mountains, which formed a barrier to the Pennsylvania canal system. Horses and mules pulled the first trains. Later steam locomotives were used. At the center of the line, Plane No.– Read More…

American Red Cross

Johns St, Johnstown, PA 15901, USA

On June 5, 1889, Clara Barton and a group of American Red Cross volunteers arrived in Johnstown to help the survivors of a devastating flood resulting from the failure of the South Fork Dam. It was one of the first major disaster responses for the humanitarian organization. The agency established feeding stations, built shelters for survivors, and rendered medical care.– Read More…

Andrew Carnegie (1835-1919)

8889 Schenley Drive Extension, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA

A poor Scottish immigrant, Carnegie became a millionaire steel magnate and proponent of the “Gospel of Wealth.” Seeking to benefit society with his fortune, he built over 2,500 libraries and endowed institutions advancing education and peace.Dedicated: Thursday, April 18, 1996Marker Type: CityMarker Missing? No– Read More…

Ankeny Square

235-255 PA-281, Somerset, PA 15501, USA

Set aside for burial ground and place of worship on the original plat of Milfordstown by Ulrich Bruner, 1787, and by Peter Ankeny in 1789 when he laid out the south side of the settlement renamed Somerset in 1795.Dedicated: Monday, June 28, 1954Marker Type: CityMarker Missing? No– Read More…

Art Blakey (1919-1990)

614 Chauncey St, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA

A founder of the “hard-bop” school of jazz, drummer Blakey grew up here, and got his start with Billy Eckstine’s band. Blakey’s group, “The Jazz Messengers,” featured Hank Mobley, Freddie Hubbard, Horace Silver, and Wynton Marsalis.– Read More…

Arthur J. Rooney

101-119 Coulterville Rd, McKeesport, PA 15131, USA

Prominent Western Pennsylvania civic and sports leader and owner of the Pittsburgh Steelers, 1933-1988. With his guidance the Steelers won four 1970s Super Bowls. An accomplished athlete, Rooney was influential in the National Football League and was inducted into the National Football Hall of Fame, 1964. His family emigrated from Ireland in the 19th century; resided in Coulter where he was born until moving to Pittsburgh.– Read More…

Arthur St. Clair

3136 Lincoln Hwy, Latrobe, PA 15650, USA

At the head of the hollow to the south was last home of Gen. St. Clair. He served in the Revolutionary army, in the Continental Congress, and was first Governor of the Northwest Territory.– Read More…

Arthur St. Clair (1737-1818)

208 Walnut Ave, Greensburg, PA 15601, USA

President, Continental Congress, 1787; member, 1785-87. First Governor of the Northwest Territory (lying between the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers), 1787-1802. Earlier, he was Westmoreland County Court Justice after the county’s formation in 1773, and Major General in the Revolutionary War, 1777.– Read More…

August Wilson (1945-2005)

744 Roberts St, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA

Co-founder of Pittsburgh’s Black Horizon Theater and the author of a cycle of ten plays that have been hailed as a unique triumph in American literature. The plays cover each decade of the 20th century and most focus on African American life in the Hill District. Two of the plays, “Fences” and “The Piano Lesson,” won Pulitzer prizes for best drama in 1987 and 1990; “Fences” also won Broadway’s Tony Award.– Read More…

Banana Split, The

805 Ligonier St, Latrobe, PA 15650, USA

In 1904 in Latrobe, the first documented Banana Split was created by apprentice pharmacist David Strickler – sold here at the former Tassell Pharmacy. Bananas became widely available to Americans in the late 1800s. Strickler capitalized on this by cutting them lengthwise and serving with ice cream. He is also credited with designing a boat-shaped glass dish for his treat.– Read More…

Beaver County

301-325 Market St, Beaver, PA 15009, USA

Formed March 12, 1800 from Washington and Allegheny counties. The county seat, Beaver, was laid out 1792-93. County’s waterways have spurred its industrial growth.– Read More…

Benjamin Wells

215 N 7th St, Connellsville, PA 15425, USA

Nearby was the house of this collector of excise tax on whiskey. In the summer of 1794, after the Whiskey Rebellion had turned violent, his house was burned down by an angry crowd.– Read More…

Berlin

600 Main St, Berlin, PA 15530, USA

This area was a center of protest during the Whiskey Rebellion. A riot occurred at the Berlin schoolhouse in June 1794. In September, according to local historians, Robert Philson raised a liberty pole at his log store on the square; he advised citizens to oppose U.S. laws. After federal troops arrived here in October, Gov. Thomas Mifflin had his headquarters in Dr.– Read More…

Bethel A.M.E. Church

400-408 First Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, USA

Founded 1808 & known as the African Church. Chartered in 1818. Located nearby in early years, church was site of area’s first school for colored children, 1831, & statewide civil rights convention, 1841.– Read More…

Billy Eckstein (1914-1993)

5911 Bryant St, Pittsburgh, PA 15206, USA

African American jazz balladeer and bandleader whose innovative style and sponsorship of new talent helped revolutionize jazz in the 1940s. One of the nation’s most popular vocalists, he had 11 gold records.– Read More…

Blanket Hill

12576 Benjamin Franklin Hwy, Kittanning, PA 16201, USA

So named from the blankets left by the Armstrong expedition after destroying Kittanning. Here also was a stopping point of the troops on en route to attack the Indians, Sept.– Read More…

Bouquet Camp

6106 Saltsburg Rd, Verona, PA 15147, USA

Bouquet Camp, a base of supply in the Forbes campaign in 1758 forcing the French to abandon Fort Duquesne, was about three miles east. Named in honor of Col.– Read More…

Bower Hill

300 Kane Blvd, Pittsburgh, PA 15243, USA

Site of Gen. John Neville’s mansion, burned to the ground by insurgents during a major escalation of violence in the Whiskey Rebellion, July 16-17, 1794. Gen. Neville was Inspector of Revenue under President Washington. In the two-day battle, Neville with his slaves and a small federal detachment met a force of over 500 rebels.– Read More…

Braddock Road (Rock Fort Camp)

2927 US-40, Hopwood, PA 15445, USA

General Braddock’s tenth camp, June 26, 1755, on the march to Fort Duquesne, was at the Half King’s Rock, one mile NE of here. The Rock was named for Washington’s friend Tanacharisson, the Iroquois viceroy (half king) of the Ohio Indians.– Read More…